In Vermont, a person is guilty of DUI if he or she operates any vehicle on a highway when the person is under the influence of any drug or under the combined influence of alcohol and any drug to a degree which renders the person incapable of driving safely.

The fact that a person charged with a violation of this section is or has been entitled to use a drug under the laws of this state shall not constitute a defense against any charge of violating this section. Penalties for

  • First offense – fine of not more than $750, or imprisonment for not more than 2 years, or both; mandatory $160 for related DUI surcharges; license/driving privileges suspended for a period of 90 days. Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 23, §§ 1210(b),(h)-(j) (West 2010); Id. § 1206(a).
  • Second offense – fine of not more than $1,500, or imprisonment not more than 2 years, or both; at least 200 hours of community service shall be performed, or 60 consecutive hours of imprisonment; mandatory $160 for related DUI surcharges; license/driving privileges suspended for a period 18 months. Id. § 1208(a); Id. §§ 1210(c),(h)-(j).
  • Third and subsequent offense – fine of not more than $2,500, or imprisonment of not more than 5 years, or both; at least 400 hours of community service, or 100 consecutive hours of the sentence of imprisonment; mandatory $160 for related DUI surcharges; license/driving privileges suspended for life. Id. §§ 1210(d),(h)-(j); Id. § 1208(b).

Vermont allows law enforcement officials to conduct sobriety checkpoints under both the state and federal constitutions.

  • Law enforcement officials conducting sobriety checkpoint do not necessarily have to have warrant, probable cause, or even articulable, individualized suspicion of illegal activity to justify an investigatory stop of motorist.

find more on norml.org